Antique Scalloped Tilt-Top Table With Decoupage Wallpaper

The furniture makeover I'm sharing today is all about layers. Removing layers of damaged veneer, layers of paint with colored wax, and adding a decoupage layer to the top. This poor little antique scalloped tilt-top table got a night and day transformation with a pretty metallic decoupage wallpaper top.



A gorgeous antique tilt-top table makeover with decoupage metallic wallpaper top.

Antique Scalloped Tilt-Top Tea Table

As you can see from the photo below, this poor antique scalloped tilt-top table looked worthy of the trash bin. But I was determined to at least try redeeming it.



An antique scalloped tilt-top table before getting a makeover.

I knew I had my work cut out for me with the VERY damaged wood veneer top but I'm a gal who loves a challenge. I mean you don't come across these tilt-top tables often. I've only come across one other, this curbside scalloped tilt-top drop-leaf table that I gave a makeover in my favorite color.



But even if the table doesn't tip up, I can't pass up a curvy beauty like this scalloped tea table makeover that I also did. If only I could find these two table styles more often.



An antique scalloped tilt-top table with very damaged wood veneer to be redeemed with a makeover.

Layer One - Removing Damaged Veneer

The first order of business was removing the damaged veneer and missing layers of plywood. I learned a trick from my friend Larissa at Prodigal Pieces for how to remove damaged veneers.



Removing damaged veneer from an antique tilt-top table with wet towels.

It worked like a charm, and I could literally peel off the veneer with my fingers.



Layer Two - Removing Damaged Plywood

Removing the damaged plywood required an extra soak with wet towels overnight. Once I removed the damage, I let the wood dry overnight and then carefully sanded it smooth with a mouse sander. I'm thrilled I was able to redeem the top, albeit not stain-worthy.



Layer Three - Painting Table Base

I had three visions for this table and all three involved painting the base white. Because the table is mahogany it is guaranteed to cause the paint to bleed so I brushed a coat of DecoArt Stain Blocker that I had on hand. I've written an entire tutorial on how to fix wood bleed.



Once the stain blocker primer was dry, I brushed four thin coats of white chalk paint to get full coverage. I lightly sanded with 220-grit sandpaper between coats for a smooth finish and waited about an hour between each coat.



Layer Four - Colored Wax Highlights

Once the last coat of paint was completely dry, I protected the painted finish with a coat of clear wax, applied with a lint-free rag.



Next, I highlighted the scalloped edge on the tabletop and some of the details on the tilt-top base with Silver Metallic Gilding Wax applied with my fingers.



Lastly, I went over the white paint on the table base with Pearl White Wax to give it an iridescent shimmer.



A scalloped tilt-top table painted white with chalk paint and metallic silver and pearl white gilding wax highlights.

Curious what age the scalloped tilt-top table might be, I did image searches on Google. It's a numbered piece, for whatever that's worth, but had no success finding another one like it. Regardless, I decided to keep the number visible when painting the bottom of the table.



A numbered antique scalloped tilt-top table in very bad shape gets a makeover.

As mentioned earlier that I had three visions for the now repaired top on this antique tilt-top table and they were:

  1. Stain the repaired plywood a medium brown color and dry brush layers of white and soft gray paint for a rustic look.
  2. Decoupage the top with sheet music paper for a whimsical touch.
  3. Decoupage the top with a soft and subtle metallic paper and apply silver metallic highlights along the scalloped edge.


Layer Five - Decoupage Wallpaper Table Top

I went with option three because it seemed the most suitable option for this dainty tea table. I cut the wallpaper slightly larger than the length and width of the tabletop so it was easy to work with.



Then I brushed wallpaper adhesive on the back of the metallic wallpaper and set it in place, rubbing my fingers into the scalloped areas. Once it was dry, I used a sharp retractable knife to trim the excess paper.



An antique scalloped tilt-top table with decoupage metallic wallpaper top.

I'm so glad I went with this option, isn't the paper pretty?



Decoupage an antique tilt-top table top with pretty metallic wallpaper.

Here is a close-up of the pretty decoupage wallpaper top.



An upcycled scalloped tilt-top table makeover with pretty metallic papered top.

In the photo below, you can see the silver metallic gilding wax around the scalloped edge.



An antique tilt-top table with decoupage top and silver gilding wax details.

Now here's where I'm going to keep it real friends. While I love the pretty metallic papered top I'm not feeling 100% certain it'll be a selling feature for potential buyers as I plan on listing this table. Do you think I should rethink the papered top and silver gilding wax?



A pretty scalloped antique tilt-top table after a makeover.

Thanks for stopping by the Interior Frugalista today! I hope you were inspired by this antique scalloped tilt-top table makeover.



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An antique scalloped tilt-top table makeover before and after with decoupage metallic wallpaper top. #tilttoptablemakeover #tilttoptableantique #tilttoptablepainted #furnituremakeover

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